Ferns, Fungi, and a Flowering Plant

I went on a plant walk along the Gunpowder with the Maryland Native Plant Society. I remember being amazed by the birders who could hear and ID Parulas, Yellow Throated Warblers, and Louisiana Waterthrushes in the distance on early spring trips to look for salamanders and flowers. Now I find that I am one of them. It is so much easier to learn the harder songs now that I find other songs so familiar. It also helps to know who to expect when, and where. These three warblers show up early, although quickly more are coming. I actually saw a pair of Louisiana Waterthrushes near what may be a nest. They make nests in mud banks, they are warblers despite their name, their legs are pink and their chip call is loud. But plants are easier to take pictures of.

IMG_0666.JPGMarginal Fern

IMG_0669.JPGRue Anemone Continue reading

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Get Sprung

Is everycreepingthing still a blog? Gee whizz, you could have fooled me, I guess it is!

Although historically experiencing a degree of hibernation each winter, recent inactive seasons may have led to some uncertainty about whether Instagram has fully replaced this outlet. Well, rest assured we are awakening from our slumber, earlier than ever before, and we are ready to learn!

Yesterday was almost 70 degrees here in Maryland. It is kind of nuts, and no guarantee that we won’t yet have a blizzard, but I am so relieved. I had forgotten how wonderful it smells to sleep with the window open, and feel sunshine on my skin.

I am also happy to report that despite growing knowledge about our natural world, this time of year is still filled with eternal rites of passage that I somehow have never even noticed happening before my eyes. Continue reading

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Winter’s Solace

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The shortest time of the year is also the beginning of the days getting longer, and for now it isn’t even so unbearably cold out.
Comparison with summer is unfair, but once summer is far enough away it is also impossible. Continue reading

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What Do Woolly Bear Caterpillars Eat?

Woolly Bear.JPGDid you ever wonder?

The Woolly Bear Caterpillar, the larval stage of the Isabella Tiger Moth, can be spotted all over the place on the East Coast this time of year. Like most insects except the Monarch, they will spend the winter here in a hibernation-like state called diapause. Many species of butterfly and moth actually spend the winter tucked into their chrysalis. The Woolly Bear is spotted out a bit later in the season perhaps in part because it actually spends the winter in caterpillar form, with a special anti-freeze inside of it that will keep it from forming ice crystals inside its body. Continue reading

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Oh Baby

Do you know that I started this blog in 2013? Yeep, things were different then. One of the different things, and the blog’s original main topic, was a baby avocado plant.

Brewed with love, well travelled, and creatively fed, this young  blog’s mascot represented bringing nature home. It journeyed to the Eastern Shore and back again while I was teaching outdoor education. Oh those simpler days. I still do not miss the long nights in tents and no time to change out of wet boots, but gosh, that fresh air, those flushed faces. The mud and the youth and Sassafras trees the rainy night board games and the salamanders.

Have things changed? Well, just ask this baby, who lived, in those wilder days, in a plastic cup.

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And I wish you my kind of success.

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There are Giants in the Sky!

I had a special morning, doing some What the Robin Knows type activities in the woods I know well. That means going outside and holding still for awhile, letting the natural world come to you. This time of year is so full of life, maybe, just maybe, the fullest. There was a bird chasing a juvenile male Pileated Woodpecker, which turned out to be a Red Bellied Woodpecker! I guess that he wanted to check out the newer drilling done by a bigger beak. There were many tadpoles and nymphs and there was a huge Green Frog staring at me from a few feet away. It took me so long to actually spot it while I peered into the water. I always wonder when frogs do this to me what else I am not noticing right before my eyes. There were little froglets (but not the littlest; they may have done some growing) hopping up the dry streambed to escape my boots. There was a flycatcher catching flies, and a lot of Chickadees. There was one Cedar Waxwing. I have never seen one by itself, but no others seemed to turn up- was I seeing the same one over and over or catching glimpses of a few? It was all so lovely, and I didn’t take pictures and I didn’t really want to… but I want you to maybe go outside too. Into the Woods!

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A Polyphemus Moth Grows Up

Three Polyphemus Eggs hatched on June 13th.

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My oh my how the time has flown, because just yesterday the first emerged from her cocoon! Here is the tiny caterpillar that almost escaped but that I finally found, after a lot of searching, clinging to my own hair.

IMG_7005.JPGSo furry! So big! How can those two photos be of the same creature sitting on my hand? Continue reading

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Another Way

Just experimenting.

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How do you Measure?

I haven’t posted all summer and here I am posting photos from winter… I thought these photos were lost forever… There are many more but I am starting at the beginning.

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From Winter to Spring in 2015. If you’d like to watch the seasons progress I think you can also click on a photo and move forward like a slideshow by clicking the forward arrow. Continue reading

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Mooning Around

E-Vo-Lu-Tion. 64. Category is: Rainy Spring.

Evolution is the name of the game. And we all play, whether to win or lose I am not so sure. We all fall down. We are all being played.

Have you read The Beak of the Finch? I read it freshman year of college (a year so long ago now that I am like all the other old people who talked to me about things that happened to them in college and I wondered what sort of unearthly world that took place in). It was a good book, required for honours Biology 2 (which was the one about zoology and evolution). I liked my professor and my TA. One day in lab we went to catch things in the stream, and the professor came too, and he praised me because I was so enthusiastic. His name was Dr. Kent and he specialized in fossils. Continue reading

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